Getting Fit With an E-Bike

A strange thing happened over this last weekend.

I work at another job on top of Biktrix, on weekends, just to help pay bills. I walked in to work on Saturday, and did my usual “Hello’s” to the front office.

But then, my manager piped up. 

“Uh, sorry for sounding inappropriate, but are you losing weight?”

I turned to her, and replied, “Yes, I have.”

”Oh. We’ve noticed.  You look good.”

What.  What?  That never happens!  I’ve always struggled with my weight - so long, in fact, that no one really ever commented on my appearance with good praise.  And while it was weird coming from my manager, out of left field, I must admit - it was appreciated.

As posted in my previous blog post regarding my weight loss journey, “Electric Bikes: A Healthy Resolution,” I lost a bit of weight by eating more vegetables, eating proper portions, cutting sugary pop, and adding a bit more exercise into my routine.

The thing I wanted to keep quiet about, (until now), was that my stomach is still a work in progress, because I have an umbilical hernia, just above my belly-button. This has proven very tough to specifically target my rather large tummy.  Sure, most people can do v-crunches at home, or do medicine ball core exercises at the gym.  But any moderate exertion from my core will cause my hernia to “make an appearance.” This has affected not only my ability to work out the way I want, but this has also affected my every-day lifting activities, (small grocery loads, can’t shovel the driveway, etc.), as well as my employment.  Jobs as of late have been considerably more computer-driven, online-oriented, and less physical. 

“So, on the left, you’ll see an umbilical - ewwwwww!” (Photo Credit - Wikipedia.org)

So, I formulated a plan of low-impact work-outs and a lot of diet-shaping, to help me lose as much as I can.  This is essential, because I was at a weight where I was not accepted for the mesh surgery for my hernia. The mesh procedure to keep my hernia in would not hold, as my tummy was too big, and there was too much pressure pushing my hernia out for the mesh to hold.  So, this weight loss is critical. 

When I lose my target weight goal, or the proper amount of inches off my gut, (whatever comes first - most likely the weight), I get the surgery I need, (probably lose a bit more, because, well, surgery), and then continue onward after recovery.

Electric bicycles are essential to this plan. Here’s why:

CONTROLLED WORKOUT:

The important thing about my delicate situation is not adding any extra stress or exertion in areas where I know it will trigger my core and trigger my hernia, but support my metabolism, cardio, and encourage me to sweat, and burn calories and fat.  Electric bicycles help by adding a battery-powered electric motor pedal assist, with adjustable settings.   You can ride the bike without using it, but there may be points where you need to use the pedal assist so you won’t over-exert yourself on a slight incline or against moderate winds.  You can use a high-level of pedal assist if you get leg cramps, or your legs are over-worked and feel like wet spaghetti, so the bike can take over and get you home. 

 

While Michael Guerra might have his own ways of giving his muscles a break, I think I would just stick to a Biktrix e-bike!  (Photo Credit: Dafne Fixed, dailymail.co.uk)

These are the little reasons why the e-bike works for my issues - never mind the mobile spin-class in every e-bike that gives a more sustained, timed, precise, smarter workout, with less recovery time.  Or, the people recovering from surgeries, people experiencing chronic pain, who need a kinder machine for their bodies to start rehabilitation, that can scale in difficulty to further growth and healing.  Or people who need a machine that is more capable of regimented exercise bursts to help them stay on track to their weight goals.  

STYLES OF E-BIKES:

As I wrote in the E-Bikes 101: Electric Bike School module regarding Styles of E-Bikes, we went through three major kinds of e-bike styles, all for different uses:

- The Folding Bike, where you can fold the frame into itself to be more compact, for storage and transport purposes

- The Cruiser, everyday commuter bikes that are light, sleek, and fast, and get to where you want to go.

- The Fatbike, that easily conquers the city work commute, but are built for off-roading, with large tires that act as suspension.

There is versatility in variety.  This is the strength of the ebike business.  Within variety, there is a bike for exactly what you need it for, whether it’s for fun, for fitness, or for any kind of healthy living, it’s there.  

The bike that would best suit my needs, based on how I live my life, how much I weigh, and how much I ride, would be the Biktrix Stunner Cruiser Commuter bike, with the mid-drive motor and the largest possible battery and motor to meet with the requirements needed for my current weight.  It provides me with enough power to go where I need to go.

Performance + balance + handling = mid-drive amazing.  The Biktrix Stunner.

JUST KEEP RIDING:

There may be some people who just choose to bike everywhere. While I do drive as well, I am reminded of a saying told to me by my Dad, which was a saying his mother told him. “Son, if you don’t have your health, you have nothing.”  Make time to ride, and get the exercise you need.  Activate that furnace of a metabolism, get those muscles larger, that fat burned, and that confidence to grow.

You just might have people notice, and make you blush when you least expect it, on the most unassuming of days.  I tell you - the road to health is quite the feeling.  

The road is long, but it can be beautiful.  Learn to enjoy the journey.

(Featured Cover Photo Credit: myhealth.alberta.ca)

 

About Robert Bryn Mann:

Robert Bryn Mann is a Customer Content Specialist at Biktrix. A professional writer, he is happy to be working with a company that shares his passion for greener transportation options. When he is not working with Biktrix, he is writing stand-up material and scripts for film and TV.


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